MEDITERANEAN COAST

Travel along the Spanish Mediterranean Coast

Past the Pyrenees, the Mediterranean Sea completely bathes the eastern coasts of Spain, up to the columns of Hercules and the Strait of Gibraltar, where the waters of the Mediterranean join those of the Atlantic.

The coast is dotted with seaside resorts and tourist sites that attract, every summer, visitors looking for sunny places with their feet in the water.

Costa Brava

At the foot of the Pyrenees, immediately after crossing the French border, Port-Bou is the first town on the Costa Brava. It extends 200 kilometres south to Blanes and the mouth of the small coastal river Tordera.

A coast where sea and mountains mix, offering a landscape of cliffs, accompanied by beautiful coves and intimate beaches. The many hiking trails allow you to discover the coast.

In addition, many of these coves characterise the Baix Emportà region, from L’Escala in the southern Gulf of Roses to San Feliu de Guíxol in the southern province of Girona.

South of Cap de Creus, which separates it from the Gulf of Lions, the Gulf of Roses is considered one of the most beautiful bays in Spain.

Costa Maresme

Particularly renowned for its mild climate and its festive and family atmosphere, the Costa Maresme is located in the province of Barcelona, in the north-east of Catalonia.

The Costa Maresme represents about fifty kilometres of coastline between the Tordera river flowing north near Malgrat de Mar and Montgat located a few kilometres from Barcelona south of Mataró.

Mataró, with its large beach and marina, is the capital of this region of the Haut-Maresme, while Calella is the main tourist destination.

Costa Dorada

Coastal area of about 210 km south of Barcelona, in the province of Tarragona, the Costa Dorada lies between Cunit, at the gateway to the Catalan capital, and Alcanar.

The largest wetland area in Catalonia, the Natural Park of the Ebro Delta is one of the destinations not to be missed for the varied landscapes offered by this part of the Costa Dorada.

A rocky coast with a succession of beaches and coves, the Costa Dorada is home to several marinas: Segur de Calafell, Salou, Cambrils, Hospitalet de l’Infant to name but a few.

Costa del Azahar

The Costa del Azahar occupies the coastline of the province of Castellón de la Plana, 120 kilometres north of the Valencian Community.

In the Irta park, sea and mountains often mix to form rocky coasts still dominated, in some places, by a network of fording towers.

There are marinas such as El Grao de Castellón, at the gates of the provincial capital, Vinaròs, Benicarló, Peñiscola, Alcossebre or Oropesa. Among the many beaches of the Costa del Azahar, those of Torreblanca or Benicàssim are the most famous.

Costa de Valencia

The Costa Valencia stretches along the Valencian Community, in the centre of Spain’s Mediterranean coast, from Port de Sagunt in the north to Oliva in the south.

Valencia, with its important port area, is the capital and main agglomeration of this part of the Spanish coast.

The port of Valencia houses the counters of several shipping companies offering ferries to the islands of Ibiza and Majorca in the Balearic archipelago.

Gandía, Miramar, Cullera south of Valencia, or Port de Sagunt to the north, are popular destinations on the Costa de Valencia.

Costa Blanca

Bordering the province of Alicante which is the main city, the Costa Blanca stretches from Torrevieja to the Cape of Nao which marks the northern tip.

As one of the major seaside tourism destinations in Spain, the Costa Blanca offers, in addition to a warm and sunny climate, a wide range of marinas, water sports and water parks, animal parks and attractions.

Among these, the Terra Mítica park, located near Benidorm, has become one of the most important Spanish amusement parks.

If the Costa Blanca is considered to be the most urbanized coastline in Spain, it has nevertheless managed to preserve places such as the dunes of Guadamar, the lagoons of Torrevieja or the nature reserve of the island of Tabarca.

Costa Cálida

The 200 km of the Costa Cálida make up the coast of the Autonomous Community of Murcia. The old city of Cartagena is both the largest city and the main port.

Located at the northeastern end of the Costa Cálida, the dunes of the Manga del Mar Menor that separate this real inland sea from the Mediterranean, is the tourist jewel of this part of the Spanish Mediterranean coast.

The site is home to the water sports resorts of Mazarrón or Águilas, which, in addition to swimming on one of the many beaches, offer many water sports: windsurfing, diving and underwater fishing, jet skiing, fishing and sea trips…

Costa de Almeria

The coast of Almeria stretches from Adra in the west to Punta el Cañón on the eastern border of the Autonomous Community of Murcia.

The Gulf of Almeria is composed of several seaside and port towns such as Roquetas de Mar, Aguadulce and of course Almeria from where it is possible to board ferries to Algeria and Morocco.

On the 200 km of wild coast of the province of Almeria alternating high cliffs, coves and beaches, we discover the Cabo de Gata. This astonishing advance at sea was the first natural area, both maritime and land, to be declared a Natural Park of Spain in 1987.

Costa Tropical

Located between the Costa del Sol and the Costa de Almeria, the Costa Tropical, also known as the coast of Granada, is the 100-kilometre coastal fringe of the province of Granada, in southeastern Spain and Andalusia.

The landscapes of the Costa Tropical are mainly composed of cliffs, coves and vast beaches. The average annual temperature is 20° for nearly 320 days of sunshine per year.

The main seaside towns are Almuñecar, Solabreña, Motrill, Castell de Ferro and La Rábita.

Costa del Sol

In the extreme south-east of Andalusia, dotted with seaside resorts, marinas and nautical clubs, discos, golf courses, with 140 beaches listed, the Costa del Sol stretches over 160 km from Algeciras to Nerva bordering the province of Malaga.

Estepona, Marbella, Torremolinos, are the most famous seaside resorts of this region which has opened to seaside tourism.

Thanks to more than 300 days of annual sunshine, the Costa del Sol, an emblematic destination on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, has seen the emergence of new towns and seaside resorts such as Benalmádena and Fuengirola.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
See As Well
Costa Brava  
Costa del Maresme  
Costa Dorada  
Costa del Azahar  
Costa de Valencia  
Costa Blanca  
Costa Calida  
Costa de Almeria  
Costa Tropical  
Costa del Sol  
Scroll Up