Fez

Fez, imperial city of Morocco

Fez is an imperial city, cultural heiress of Al Andalus and spiritual capital of Morocco. Fez is also a city of memory that was built during three distinct periods.

Fez el Bali, the historic city, was founded in 789 by Idriss 1st who made it the first imperial capital of Morocco.

The 9th century saw the foundation of the Quaraouiyin university mosque financed by Fatima El Fihriya, a rich aristocrat from Kairouan in Tunisia.

Considered as the oldest university in the Arab-Muslim world, it became one of the principal centres of research and reflection of its time. Participating in the Golden Age of Islamic intellectuals, its influence extended to Al Andalus and Europe attracting a large number of scholars and mystics.

Fez lost its status as a capital in 1069 under the Almoravid dynasty which settled in Marrakech, to find it again in 1250 with the arrival of the Merinids in power.

Fez el Bali and Fez Jdid will be linked in a single city in the 19th century. Fez remained the capital of the Cherifian kingdom until 1912, when the French developed the “new city” south of Fez Jdid.

Fez, the oldest of the Moroccan imperial cities, was for a long time the cultural and spiritual center of the kingdom. The intellectual, political and religious elite of the Kingdom was formed there until the beginning of the 20th century.

Classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the medina of Fez conceals many treasures, including the oldest university in the Muslim world. It was during the reign of the Merinids in the 13th and 14th centuries that Fez reached its peak.

The main monuments of the medina are the medina: medersas, palaces, fondouks, mosques and synagogues, riads and gardens, monumental gates, as well as a large number of fountains scattered throughout the medina.

Fez el Bali

The medina of Fez el Bali has always kept its medieval structures. It encloses two jewels of Arab-Muslim architecture, the Andalusian Mosque and the Médersa Quaraouiyine. It has about 10,000 small alleys, some of which are very narrow and only a metre wide. The medina of Fez is completely car-free and bicycles or scooters are quite rare.

Only donkeys and mules, a few famelic horses, sometimes pulling small carrioles, are admitted.

It should be recalled that many religious sites in the city are not open to non-Muslims. This law was enacted in 1914 by the French Resident General, Admiral Lyautey, for the respect of these holy places.

Medina of Fez

A signposting of six different colourful thematic itineraries at strategic points along these routes has made it easier to stroll alone according to one’s own pace and interests without getting lost in the narrow streets of the medina.

The squares of the medina

Fez el Bali is full of plots specialized in a craft product or not. In the labyrinth of alleys proposed by the medina, some are often difficult to place on a plane. Asking for location and direction is often the best solution.

Boujloud square

Its location at the entrance to the medina has always made it a picturesque place where storytellers, dancers and folklore groups can be found, and along the ramparts a market for the fripes.

Located between Fez el Bali and Fez Jdid, it is bordered on one side by the Sbil Garden and the prestigious Moulay Idriss High School on the other by crenellated adobe ramparts pierced by the monumental Bab Mabrouk, Bab Ech-Chem and Bab Ech-Chorfa gates.

Serrajine Square, Talâa Kbira and Talâa Sghira

It marks the entrance into the medina once it has passed through the Bab Boujloud gate. The square is lined with cafés, restaurants and gargotes, and gives access to the interior of the medina through its two main arteries: Talâa Kebira, on its left, and Talâa Sghira in its extension.

The two streets are the economic heart of the medina, bordered by colourful shops almost all along its route and crossing numerous souks. Many historical monuments mark out their course.

Seffarin Square, dinandiers

On this charming square, in addition to the dinandiers from whom it takes its name, lies the medersa Seffarin. Built in 1280 by the Merinid Sultan Abu Yusuf, it was one of the first colleges of this kind, as well as the library Al Qaraouiyin University.

The dinanderie has always been a leading craft in the fassie tradition. The hammering of the metal shaped by the master boilermakers or dinandiers is a constant reasoning in a concert of sounds down to the alleyways.

Just next door, the little place Mechchatine is specialized in the craft of combs and horn objects.

Haddadine square. Formerly specialized in the manufacture of weapons, the craft of wrought iron has now settled there.

Ttarrafine square. If your walking shoes have left you in the background, this is where you will have to come and have them repaired or buy new ones…

Ahabin square. Small market of medicinal plants and spices.

Echamaine square. The corner of wax, candles and rosaries.


ACTIVITIES IN FEZ


The historical gates of the medina

Bab Boujloud

Bab Boujloud, built in the 12th century and renovated in 1913, is certainly the most famous of the 26 gates of the medina. With its blue enamelled ceramics from Fez on the outside and Islam green on the inside, it is the main entrance to the medina of Fez el Bali.

Bab Boujloud, located not far from the bus station, opens on two of the main arteries of the medina: Talâa Kbira and Talâa Srigha, literally the big and small ascent that meet at the souk Aïn Allou.

Bab el Guissa

Located near the Jamaican palace, it was built by Prince Aguissa ibn Donas in the 12th century on the western bank of the wadi Bou Khrareb. A bird market is held outside its walls on Friday morning, while a mosque and a medersa have taken its name inside. This neighborhood is home to carpentry and cabinet-making workshops.

Bab Ftouh

Built in the XIth century by Prince Zenete Al Foutous, it is the oldest gate of the medina. It is located to the east of the old town on the square of the same name, where the Bab Ftouh bus station is located, which serves by bus and large taxis all over Eastern Morocco.

Bab Dekkakin

Opposed to Bab Semmarine, it marks the northern entrance of the Grande Rue de Fès Jdid on the side. Imposing with its appearance of a fortified castle, it is also called the court door, because it was in its shadow that the criminals were judged in the Middle Ages.

Bab Semmarine

This imposing door that marked the entrance to Fez Jdid was destroyed. It was rebuilt in 1924. To the right and underneath its vault, on the site of former Merinid silos, there is a colourful food court. Leading to the main street of Fez Jdid, it leads to many souks.

Souks, the soul of Fez el Bali

Chouara, the souk of tanners

It is located near the oued Bou Khrareb whose waters are unfortunately polluted by discharges of dyes and chemicals from tanneries.

Lost in a lacis of alleyways, its access is now facilitated by the signposting of courses set up in the medina. Otherwise it is always possible to obtain the services of a guide.

It is from the top of a terrace next to a maroquin maker that you can admire the spectacle of the extent of tanneries and the numerous workers working around the vats of dyeing in dried and tiled bricks.

Despite the smells, the visit of the tanneries, which have hardly changed since medieval times, remains a highlight of a visit to the medina.

More than 3000 skins are treated daily. These, sheep, goats or calves are still transported there on donkeys to be dried in the sun and then cleaned and dyed.

Pomegranate bark or date cores are always in the spotlight for the quality dyes that will decorate your slippers, handbags or wallets.

Souk el-henna

This souk, one of the oldest in Fez, begins after En-Nejjarine square, at the level of the magnificent fountain decorated with zelliges and a carved wooden pediment, to lie down in the nearby alleys.

Besides the true Moroccan henna, there are also natural dyes such as ghassoul, a clay found only in Morocco, kohl, rose water and what to satisfy the ladies with a wide range of natural and cosmetic products.

Souk Nejjarine

The Arabic word nejjar meaning carpenter, this souk in continuation of the Place En-Nejjarine, gathers a part of the craftsmen cabinetmakers carpenter. In these workshops, we have the opportunity to discover the age-old work of these carpenters working mainly cedar wood from the Middle Atlas.

Continuing towards the Al Qaraouiyin Mosque, the Attarine souk shares the scents of its spice shops with us.

Souk Boujloud

At the entrance to Talâa Kebira, a few meters from the door, fruit and vegetable stalls, butchers and poultry stalls are close to many hardware stores. Next door we discover small cafes or traditional restaurants and some cheap hotels.

Souk R’ cif

Souk R’ cif

In the heart of the medina, it is the most important food market in the old town. All the food needed for Moroccan cooking can be found on a myriad of stalls.

Souk Aïn Allison

Paradise of the craft industry of leather goods, it is in its stalls that are sold babouches, handbags, leather poufs, wallets…

Souk Tillisse

For lovers of beautiful carpets.

Souk Haik

There are many examples of traditional weaving articles, fabrics, wool or cotton for making djellabas, traditional capes and haiks.

Souk des Pigeons de Bab el Guissa

This bi-weekly souk offers every Friday and Sunday morning the sale and purchase of all kinds of birds.

Souk Marqtane (Souk Laghzal)

Formerly used for various purposes, including selling to slaves, the souk now offers different sales. Early in the morning, women come to propose spun wool or second-hand objects.

The kissariyat

Many in the medina are small marketplaces such as shopping arcades, usually reserved for a single product.

Kissariya Serrajine

It is located in an old building with an inner courtyard enclosed by a heavy gate at night, at the entrance to Talâa Sghira, opposite the Boujloud gate. Inside small silverware, babouches and caftans shops.

Tissueissariya

It is located in the Grande Rue de Fès Jdid and has a very large sample of coloured fabrics.

Fondouks

The fondouks, many in the medina of Fez, are former caravanserai, hotels also used as warehouses for goods and animals.

They are essential to the life of the medina, they have been designed around a large central square courtyard whose perimeter is reserved for stables and workshops, the guest rooms being upstairs.

Traditional place of trade and exchanges between craftsmen and traders, they were once staked out the caravan routes.

In the medina they are often used as souk and workshops or, like the one in Nejjarine Square, have been transformed into a museum.

Fez Jdid

Originally referred to as El Medinet El-Beida, the white city, Fez el Jdid was founded in 1276 under the Merinid dynasty. Conceived as a fortress, its ramparts shelter the Royal Palace, the Méchouar and gardens in which it is pleasant to walk, isolated from the tumultuous and colorful frenzy of the alleyways of the souks.

The main street, Grande Rue de Fès Jdid, crosses what has become a district separating Dar El Makzen, the Royal Palace from the souks and kissariyat that adjoining it. Less touristic than those in the medina, the business will be better.

One enters mainly into Fez Jdid through two gates: Bab Dekkakine and Bab Bab Bab Semmarine.

The Mellah

To the south, past Bab Semmarine, the Grande Rue des Mérinides crosses the Mellah district, separated from the Royal Palace by Bou Khemissa street.

This district, formerly intended for the Jewish population, is the first of its kind in Morocco. It was designed in the ancient Kasbah of the garrison of Syrian archers, near the Royal Palace by the Merinid Sultan Abu Mohammed Abd el-Hak, to protect the Jewish population from the religious fanaticism engendered by the Almohad dynasty.

The mellah, completed in 1438, is crossed by the Grande Rue des Mérinides, the main shopping street. It is bordered by houses, all of which are on the ground floor, often one of the stalls of one of the many craftsmen who were masters in the art of goldsmithing.

The houses, now inhabited by modest families, have retained large balconies of unknown Spanish or Italian inspiration in the medina. These balconies overlook the ambient hubbub while the lively alleys of the neighbourhood barely see the sun.

Access: Hassan II Avenue. Louajryine bus station.

The Méchouar

The old Mechouar, the place of arms on which the official demonstrations took place under the merinids, is accessed by the small Mechouar.

This vast enclosure decorated with pillars and bas-reliefs is an integral part of the Palace. It was there that the sovereign consulted his advisers and rendered justice in open court.

Its imposing ramparts, shaded by beaters, storytellers and dancers, are now home to storks that have made it their preferred breeding ground. But also concerts such as the sacred music festival of the world.

Access: Bab Makina. Moulay Abdallah bus station.

Souks, the soul of Fez el Bali

Chouara, the souk of the tanners

It is located near the Bou Khrareb wadi, whose waters are unfortunately polluted by the discharges of dyes and chemicals from tanneries.

Lost in a laced alleyway, its access is now facilitated by the signposting of courses set up in the medina. Otherwise it is always possible to obtain the services of a guide.

It is from the top of a terrace adjoining a morocco maker’s terrace that one can admire the spectacle of the extent of tanneries and the numerous workers working around the dry earth and tiled brick dye vats.

Despite the smells, the visit of the tanneries, which have not changed much since medieval times, remains a highlight of a visit to the medina.

More than 3000 skins are treated daily. These, sheep, goats or calves are still transported there on donkeys to be dried in the sun and then cleaned and dyed.

Pomegranate bark or date cores are always in the spotlight for the quality dyes that will decorate your slippers, handbags or wallets.

Souk el-henna

This souk, one of the oldest in Fez, begins after En-Nejjarine square, at the level of the magnificent fountain decorated with zelliges and a carved wooden pediment, to extend into the surrounding alleys.

In addition to genuine Moroccan henna, there are also natural colours such as ghassoul, a clay found only in Morocco, kohl, rose water and enough to satisfy women with a wide range of natural and cosmetic products.

Souk Nejjarine

The Arabic word nejjar meaning carpenter, this souk in continuation of the Place En-Nejjarine, gathers a part of the craftsmen cabinetmakers carpenter. In these workshops, we have the opportunity to discover the age-old work of these carpenters working mainly cedar wood from the Middle Atlas.

Continuing towards the Al Qaraouiyin Mosque, the Attarine souk shares the scents of its spice shops.

Souk Boujloud

At the entrance to Talâa Kebira, a few meters from the door, fruit and vegetable stalls, butchers and poultry stalls are surrounded by numerous hardware stores. Next door we discover small cafés or traditional restaurants and some cheap hotels.

Souk R’ Cif

In the heart of the medina, it is the most important food market in the old town. All the food needed for Moroccan cooking can be found on a myriad of stalls.

Souk Ain Allou

Paradise of the craft industry fassi of leather goods, it is in its stalls that are sold babouches, handbags, leather poufs, wallets…

Souk Tillisse

For people who like beautiful carpets.

Souk Haik

There are many examples of traditional weaving articles, fabrics, wool or cotton for making djellabas, traditional capes and haiks.

Pigeons of Bab el Guissa Souk

This bi-weekly souk offers every Friday and Sunday morning the sale and purchase of all kinds of birds.

Souk Marqtane (Souk Laghzal)

Formerly used for various purposes, including selling to slaves, the souk now offers various sales. Early in the morning, women come to propose spun wool or second-hand objects.

The kissariyat

Many in the medina are small marketplaces such as a shopping mall, usually reserved for a single product.

Kissariya Serrajine

Housed in an old building with an enclosed inner courtyard and a heavy door at night, it is located at the entrance to Talâa Sghira, opposite the Boujloud gate. Inside small silverware shops, babouches and caftans.

Kissariya of fabrics

It is located in the Grande Rue de Fès Jdid and has a very large sample of coloured fabrics.

Fondouks

The fondouks, numerous in the medina of Fez, are ancient caravanserai, hotels also used as warehouses for goods and animals.

Essential to the life of the medina, they have been designed around a large central square courtyard whose perimeter is reserved for stables and workshops, the guest rooms being upstairs.

Traditional place of trade and exchanges between craftsmen and traders, they were once staked out the caravan routes.

In the medina they are often used as souk and workshops or, like the one in Nejjarine Square, have been transformed into a museum.

Al Quaraouiyine Mosque University

At the same time pearl of the medina and cultural lighthouse of Arab-Islamic civilization, the mosque Al Quaraouiyin made of Fez “the home of science and wisdom”.

Founded by Fatima Bent Mohamed Al Fihri, the daughter of a wealthy Kairouan immigrant businessman in the 9th century on Talâa Kebira street, its construction corresponds to the creation by the Idrisside dynasty of the first Moroccan Muslim kingdom.

Due to the lack of sources, loss of archives, the historical context of the foundation of Quaraouiyyne and its expansion are little known.

Nevertheless, it is known that all the following Cherifian dynasties, aware of the growing international cultural influence of Al Quaraouiyin, participated in restoration and expansion works. This will become even more important under the dynasty of Alawites known for their interest in science.

From the 12th century onwards, important Arab-Andalusian culture, many scholars of the time, forerunners of Sufism, philosophers such as Averroes and Avenpace or the future Pope Sylvestre II, stayed there.

The mosque, which can accommodate 20,000 faithful, is forbidden to non-Muslims, but the inner courtyards paved with marble and the two kiosks of the 16th and 17th centuries can be seen through the opening of the leaves, which are a replica of those of the Alhambra of Granada.

Access: Talâa Kebira.

Andalusian Mosque

Located in the Andalusian quarter of Fez el Bali, to which it gave its name. It was built in 860 by Mariyam al Fihri, Fatima’s sister and founder of Al Quaraouiyne.

A simple oratory, it gradually became a mosque in its own right, the limits of which were drawn by the Almohads. The merinids added a fountain in the inner courtyard and a library, then it was renovated by Moulay Ismaïl Sultan Alawite of Morocco from 1672 to 1727.

The mosque is known for its monumental gate with zelliges and carved cedarwood awning. A white minaret decorated with green earthenware overlooks marble and onyx patios surrounding the inner fountain. The Andalusian quarter is accessed through the tanneries of Chouara or Bab Ftouh.

Zaouïa and Mausoleum Moulay Idriss

Situated between the Nejjarine Square and the Attarine souk, completely inserted in the teacis of alleyways of the medina, the Zaouïa Moulay Idriss contains the mausoleum of Moulay Idriss II, founder of the city.

The building, designed in the 14th century, has been renovated many times, its walls and floors are entirely decorated with zelliges. 7 doors give access to the mosque; women’s doors on the left side give access to the courtyard of the mosque. The main door leads to a ceiling carved with cedar wood.

Famous place of pilgrimage, many faithful come, sometimes from far away, to make offerings.

The medersas

If the term medersa or madrassa in Arabic is also used for a Muslim theological university, it refers above all to a school, whether secular or religious, whatever the denomination.

Médersa Bou Inania

Founded between 1350 and 1355 for the Merinid Sultan Abu Inan Fares, Bou Inania, at the time the most important school in the city, is the only medersa of Fez with a minaret.

Open to non-Muslims, it was used for teaching and housing students and as a Friday mosque. Alongside it, shops and large latrines, testifying to its public use, provided financing.

Located in Talâa Kebira Street not far from Bab Boujloud, its main door opens onto a vast courtyard paved with marble and onyx giving access to two halls serving as study rooms and dominated by carved wooden domes.

On the first floor are the student cells, which are accessed through narrow corridors from the entrance vestibule. Students were kept in the room for 20 days during the exam period. On the left side of the main entrance is a small door, poetically called “barefoot”, because a piped water line allowed them to access the mosque without staining the premises.

Like the Marinid constructions, the Medersa’s décor is rich. Ornamental motifs of Islamic stucco, carved cedar wood, marble columns and mosaics are honoured in this elegant and refined setting.

The Medersa is one of the buildings of the Muslim cities classified as Islamic Science Teaching Centres. Open every day from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. (7 p. m. in the summer), admission 1 €. Access: Talâa Kebira.

Dar Al-Magana

Located in Talâa Kebira next to the medersa Bou Inania, this house built in 1357 near the kasbah Boujloud by Abu Inane houses a hydraulic log clock designed by the craftsmen of Fez in the Marinid period and erected during the last days of the construction of the medersa.

This work is a true testament to the ingenuity of Arab-Muslim scholars of the time. For since the 5 centuries of its inertia, the mystery of its functioning has remained unaddressed despite the few architectural elements still visible. Arched windows and stamp holders allow researchers to focus on the hypothesis that a system of unequal hours works.

Access: Talâa Kebira.

Ibn Danan Synagogue

A jewel of the Fassian Jewish culture, the Abendanan synagogue was founded in the 17th century. This synagogue, which is considered to be the oldest synagogue in the city, after having been used as a prison in the 18th century, was then rehabilitated in its original functions and became one of the privileged spaces of Moroccan Judaism, which still had 250,000 people in the first half of the 19th century.

Its renovation completed in 2013, enlarged, it has become a synagogue museum open to cultural and tourist visits.

Access: Mellah. Grande Rue des Mérinides. Opening hours: every day except Saturday from 9 am to 6 pm. Admission: 1 €.

Nejjarine Museum of Wooden Arts and Crafts

The Museum of Wooden Arts and Crafts is located in an ancient caravanserai, a Fondouk, a trading place erected in 1711 under the reign of Sultan Moulay Ismail.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site and unique of its kind, this museum, Morocco’s first private museum specializing in wood crafts and arts in Morocco, offers three levels of thematic exhibitions.

Household objects: shelves, wedding chairs, toys and trunks from different regions are followed by architectural carvings, ancient musical instruments and liturgical objects.

All these samples of wood species, carpentry tools and other traditional crafts, as well as these domestic woods, whose functions are essentially linked to everyday activities, are characterized by their sobriety and simplicity.

From the top of its terrace, a beautiful view overlooks the medina and the surrounding hills. The site of the Mérinides tombs is particularly visible.

Opening hours: every day except Tuesday from 10 am to 5 pm. Admission: 2 €. Access: Nejjarine square by the Grand Talâa street.

Dar Batha Museum of Popular Arts and Traditions

Designed at the end of the 19th century, under the reign of Sultan Moulay Hassan I who wished to hold royal audiences, this palace in the Arabo-Andalusian style is located a stone’s throw from Bab Boujloud. It was completed and embellished after his death in 1894 by his son and successor Moulay Abdelaziz.

It was within its walls that the Treaty of Protectorate was signed between France and Morocco in 1912 before it became a museum in 1915. It houses treasures of the striking richness of traditional craftsmanship and traditional Fassie.

The museum exhibits zelliges and wrought irons, dinanderie, carved wood and jewelry, embroidery and carpets. Nevertheless, its major attraction comes from its incredible collection of pottery and ceramics with the beautiful “Fez blue” color obtained from cobalt, which Fez has been specializing in for more than 1000 years.

Another curiosities of this museum are astrolabes, astronomical instruments invented during the 2nd century BC by Hipparchus, a Greek scientist. An apparatus used to determine the hours according to the stars, Arabian scientists perfected it in the 10th century to calculate the hours of prayer according to the sunrises and sunsets.

Access: on the Batha square, a few tens of meters to the right of Bab Boujloud. Opening hours: every day except Tuesday, from 8:30 a. m. to 12 noon and from 2:30 p. m. to 6 p. m. Admission: 1 €.

Museum of Arms, Borj Nord

The arms museum is located in the Borj Nord, a fort built in 1588 north of Fez by Sultan Ahmed Al Mansour to monitor and counter foreign threats.

This fort, whose architecture is inspired by the 16th century Portuguese fortresses, was one of the most important surveillance posts in the city. Also used for the manufacture of guns, its four corners are equipped with as many bastions in the shape of spearheads and its terrace was designed to resist the weight and fire of the guns.

Used as a barracks and then as a prison during the Protectorate, the building was transformed into a weapons museum in 1963.

Formerly presented at the Batha Palace, the arms collection that it presents comes largely from the Makina, an arsenal founded at the end of the 19th century by Sultan Moulay Hassan I.

This rich collection offers weapons ranging from prehistoric times to the weapons of Hassan II’s personal guard, American colts and the first Moroccan pistols of the 18th century.

From the crossbow to slingshot and traps, from machine guns to explosives and mortars, these hundreds of pieces (1089) exhibited, with Asian, European or American origins, are distributed across 15 rooms.

Open every day except Tuesday from 8 a. m. to 12 noon and from 2:30 p. m. to 6 p. m. Admission: 1,50 €.

Garden Jnane Sbil

The Jnane Sbil garden, the first green space of Fez opened to the public, was created by Sultan Moulay Abadallah in the 18th century and is located a few minutes from Bab Boujloud between Fez el Jdid and the medina of Fez el Bali.

A large variety of plant species, about 3000, some of which are very rare, thrive in thematic gardens lined with vast shady alleys on these 7 hectares sheltered from the colourful hubbub of the medina.

The green lung of Fez, the Mexican, Andalusian or “bamboo” gardens, are crossed by canals fed with water by norias. A lake and a huge star with 5 floral branches, formerly a meeting place for nationalists under the protectorate, water jets and numerous basins complete this bucolic and restful setting.

The Mohammed VI Foundation for Environmental Protection, which had been abandoned for too long, financed the work needed to rehabilitate it. Inaugurated by Princess Lalla Hasna in June 2010, to the delight of a large audience, it reopened its doors in 2011. The park is open daily from 9 am to 8 pm.



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Riad L’Artiste

Fez – From 34 €

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Riad sunrise

Fez – From 46 €

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Riad Sanaa Rose

Fez – From 46 €

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Riad Lalla Zoubida

Fez – From 55 €

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Dar Faracha Fes

Fez – From 75 €

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Riad Layla

Fez – From 79 €

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